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Neil deGrasse Tyson: Elon Musk Is The Most Important Person Alive Today
 
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""As important as Steve Jobs was, here's the difference: Elon Musk is trying to invent a future, not by providing the next app," says renowned astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf "What Elon Musk is doing is not simply giving us the next app that will be awesome on our smartphone," deGrasse Tyson says. "No, he is thinking about society, culture, how we interact, what forces need to be in play to take civilization into the next century." Between Musk's work at Tesla developing electric cars and his SpaceX plans to put humans on Mars by 2024 (and, eventually, to colonize the planet), the billionaire tech executive is attempting to revolutionize both human transportation and space exploration, deGrasse Tyson says. Of course, as an astrophysicist and director of the Hayden Planetarium in New York, deGrasse Tyson might be expected to have a soft spot for Musk's grand intergalactic plans. But deGrasse Tyson, who also hosts the show "StarTalk" on the National Geographic Channel, argues that space colonization could have a tremendous impact on civilization, potentially eliminating the need for warring over dwindling natural resources. "Because there's unlimited resources in space; resources that, on Earth, we fight wars over," deGrasse Tyson tells CNBC Make It. "In space, you don't need to fight a war, just go to another asteroid and get your resources. A whole category of war has the potential of evaporating entirely with the exploitation of space resources, which includes the unlimited access to energy as well." That's the sort of universal issue that Musk is trying to tackle, deGrasse Tyson argues, which gives him the potential to have the greatest long-term effect on our civilization. "[H]e will transform civilization as we know it," deGrasse Tyson says. Granted, Musk has had his share of detractors over the past year. Musk was forced to step down from his role as Tesla's chairman as part of a settlement with the SEC over a series of tweets in August in which he discussed taking Tesla private (the SEC alleged the tweets constituted fraud on Musk's part). The billionaire CEO has also received quite a bit of criticism for, among other things: seemingly smoking marijuana on video, calling a British cave diver a "pedo" on Twitter, and clashing with journalists during an earnings call. However, deGrasse Tyson feels that Musk is somewhat underappreciated, though he argues that Musk is beloved by many people, including Tesla owners and anyone interested in space exploration. ("Go, Elon Musk! And, I don't care if he gets high," deGrasse Tyson jokes about the controversy over Musk supposedly using drugs.) "People who own Teslas love their Tesla …" deGrasse Tyson says. "Anyone who knows and cares about space exploration knows and cares about Elon Musk." "[W]e're on the frontier of the future of civilization, and no I don't think he gets his full due from all sectors of society," says deGrasse Tyson, "but ultimately he will when the sectors that he is pioneering transform the lives of those who currently have no clue that their life is about to change." About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/2OIdwqJ #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #ElonMusk Neil deGrasse Tyson: Why Elon Musk is more important than Jeff Bezos, Steve Jobs and Mark Zuckerberg | CNBC Make It.
Views: 539395 CNBC Make It.
Inside A $159 Million Mega-Mansion – Secret Lives Of The Super Rich
 
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"Playa Vista Isle" is a 60,000-square-foot Versailles-inspired mega-mansion on Florida's Gold Coast, covered in 22-karat gold accents. It's up for auction on Nov. 15 with no reserve. Read more about the property here: https://cnb.cx/2RRyofV The owner of the estate spared no expense and spent five years building the one-of-a-kind, Neoclassical castle. And now that his architectural masterpiece is complete, he's decided to auction off the property to the highest bidder — with no reserve. The mansion is in Hillsboro Beach, half way between Miami and Palm Beach. It sits on a strip of land with the Intracoastal Waterway in front and the Atlantic out back. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/2OIdwqJ #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt I went inside this $159 million Florida mega-mansion inspired by Versailles — and it blew my mind | CNBC Make It.
Views: 668203 CNBC Make It.
What It’s Like To Be A Delta Flight Attendant
 
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Melissa Pittman is a Delta flight attendant based out of New York but makes a 5.5 hour commute from Los Angeles. If you want to become a flight attendant for Delta, you’re going to face stiff competition: Each year, more than 100,000 people apply and less than 1 percent get the job. To put that degree of difficulty into perspective, it’s harder to fly with Delta than it is to get into Harvard, which, in 2018, accepted 4.6 percent of students. Those lucky enough to survive the interview stage then go through an eight-week training program that covers everything from how to handle a medical emergency to how to adhere to Delta’s strict dress code. Trainees have to pass multiple tests throughout training, plus a 100-question final exam, in order to earn their wings. For the final stage of training, flight attendants start working full-time but remain “on probation,” which means that they can’t lead any flights. If they pass the six-month probation period, they’re eligible to take on more responsibility as a flight leader. As I learned when I spent a 10-hour day shadowing Delta flight attendant Melissa Pittman, there’s a lot more to the job than serving food and drinks to passengers. “The biggest misconception ever is the fact that people think we’re glorified waitresses,” Pittman told me. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt What It’s Like To Be A Delta Flight Attendant | CNBC Make It.
Views: 402332 CNBC Make It.
Bill Gates Wasn't Worried About Burnout In 1984 – Here's Why
 
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When he was 28 years old, Bill Gates was confident that he wouldn't burn out by age 30. This is why he was so sure. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf Burnout is a common problem in today's workforce, even among younger employees. But when Bill Gates was young, he was confident that it wouldn't happen to him. Gates taught himself programming at the age of 13, and, after dropping out of Harvard, founded Microsoft when he was just 19 years old. Microsoft landed its first big contract when he was 21, and in March of 1984 — when Gates was just 28 — he told Jane Pauley on NBC's "TODAY" that he was expecting Microsoft to hit just over $100 million that year in revenue. It seemed the young founder might be burning the candle at both ends. Was Gates, Pauley asked, worried about being burned out by 30? No, he assured her. "How do you know?" Pauley asked. "Well, the work we're doing is – it's not like we're doing the same thing all day long," said 28-year-old Gates. "We go into our offices and think up new programs, we get together in meetings, we go out and see end users, we talk to customers. There's so much variety and there's always new things going on. And I don't think there'll ever come a time when that would be boring." Indeed, Gates did not burn out. He went on to build Microsoft into a massive tech empire, and became the youngest billionaire in history in 1987 when he was 31 years old, shortly after Microsoft went public. In 1995, he became the richest man in the world, with a reported fortune of $12.9 billion, a title that he held on and off for decades. Gates, now 63, is still the second richest person the world with a net worth of $97.6 billion, and keeps busy alongside his wife Melinda as the chair of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the world's largest private charitable foundation, according to Forbes. It's safe to say that for Gates, burnout wasn't really an issue. But even back when he was 28, the thought of an immense fortune isn't what drove him to work tirelessly. When asked by Pauley in 1984 whether he was in it for the money, he said that money wasn't what excited him. "I don't think anyone at the company is in it for the money," Gates said in the 1984 interview. "It's a much more exciting field than trying to measure exactly how much we're selling or how much it's worth. The creation of these programs is something you can sit down and see people enjoying and and solving real problems." About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/2OIdwqJ #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #BillGates Watch 28-year-old Bill Gates explain why he didn't see himself as a genius | CNBC Make It.
Views: 259158 CNBC Make It.
How Allbirds Became A $1.4 Billion Sneaker Start-Up – The Upstarts
 
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The simple wool shoe started as a Silicon Valley favorite and has spread to Hollywood and beyond. Introducing The Upstarts, a new series about the companies you love that came out of nowhere and are now everywhere. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf In 2012, Tim Brown called it quits on an eight-year professional soccer career that included a trip to the 2010 FIFA World Cup as New Zealand's vice captain. After retiring, one thing from Brown's playing days would not stop bugging him: the sneakers. Throughout his playing career, Brown's teams (he played in the U.S., Australia and New Zealand) were sponsored by big-name sneaker manufacturers like Adidas and Nike. But Brown felt the sneakers he wore on and off the field were often too flashy, awash with too many different colors and packed with corporate logos. He wanted something simpler. So, he decided to make his own. Today, Tim Brown, 37, is co-founder and co-CEO of Allbirds, the San Francisco-based sneakers start-up that's taking the world by storm, one pair of feet at a time. The billion-dollar company's shoes are famous for being both unbelievably comfortable and constructed with natural, environmentally friendly materials like merino wool and eucalyptus tree fiber. Google reviews of Brown's increasingly ubiquitous footwear include phrases like "shockingly comfortable" and "they're like slippers made of clouds." Not only are Brown's sneakers cozy and sustainable, they're also minimalist in look and sales strategy. Allbirds sells only about half a dozen varieties of its shoes in solid, often understated, colors such as "Natural Grey" or "Tuke Honey" (which shares the name of a New Zealand river). That model stands in contrast to much of the $64 billion global athletic footwear market, where companies like Nike and Adidas churn out hundreds of varieties of shoes with endless options for customization while "sneakerhead" culture creates a market for flashy collaborations involving brands, athletes, celebrities and designers that can see the most coveted shoes sell for thousands of dollars per pair. "I had a very, very simple insight that shoes were over-logoed, over-colored and changed all the time for no reason," Brown tells CNBC Make It. "And, it was very, very difficult to find 'simple.' And I set out to solve that." Nearly all of Allbirds' shoes sell for $95 per pair (high tops released in November go for $115) and Brown says the company sold its 1 millionth pair just two years after officially launching in March 2016. Read more about Allbirds here: https://cnb.cx/2LvGAk9 About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/2OIdwqJ #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #Allbirds How Allbirds went from Silicon Valley fashion staple to a $1.4 billion sneaker start-up | CNBC Make It.
Views: 271737 CNBC Make It.
Billionaire Warren Buffett: Top Tips For Investing In The Stock Market
 
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Warren Buffett is one of the most powerful investors in the world. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf Today Buffett is CEO of Berkshire Hathaway, but he bought his first stock when he was just 11. And he’s been very, very good at it. Buffett is worth $82.5 billion, according to Forbes, making him the third richest person alive (behind Amazon founder Jeff Bezos and his friend and Microsoft co-founder, Bill Gates). So how does he do it? Here are five of his best bits of investing wisdom. 1. Investing is a long game “Now if they think they can dance in and out [of the market] and buy and sell stocks, they ought to head for Las Vegas. I mean, they can’t do that,” Buffett told “Squawk Box” October 2014. “But what they can do is determinate that there’s a number of solid American businesses, a great number of them, and if you own a cross section of them and particularly if you buy them over time, you basically can’t lose.” “I know what markets are going to do over a long period of time: They’re going to go up. But in terms of what’s going to happen in a day or a week or a month or a year even, I’ve never felt that I knew it and I’ve never felt that was important,” Buffett told Becky Quick on “Squawk Box” in February 2016. ”I will say that in 10 or 20 or 30 years, I think stocks will be a lot higher than they are now. ” Buffett has also likened buying stocks to owning more tangible assets. “If you own stocks like you’d own a farm or apartment house, you don’t get a quote on those every day or every week,” Buffett told “Squawk Box.” So, too, should it be when you’re buying a share of a company. 2. Diversify To protect your money, buy stocks in various different kinds of companies and spread your purchases out over time. “The best thing with stocks, actually, is to buy them consistently over time,” Buffett told “Squawk Box” in February 2017. “You want to spread the risk as far as the specific companies you’re in by owning a diversified group, and you diversify over time by buying this month, next month, the year after, the year after, the year after.” 3. Stocks are now generally better than bonds “If you save money, you can buy bonds, you can buy a farm, you can buy an apartment/house — or you can buy a part of an American business,” Buffett said in February. “And if you buy a 10-year bond now, you’re paying over 40 times earnings for something whose earnings can’t grow. You compare that to buying equities, good businesses, I don’t think there’s any comparison.” A 10-year government bond opened the day at a 2.32 percent interest rate and closed at 2.49 percent on Feb. 27, 2017, when Buffett made the comment. As of Dec. 17, 2018, the 10-year government bond had an interest rate of 2.87 percent. Meanwhile, the benchmark S&P 500 Index has averaged an annual return of 10.2 percent over the past 30 years, according to FactSet. Clearly, even as Buffett himself has said, anything can happen in markets. If bond interest rates overtake stock market returns, then this advice no longer holds. “But I would say this: If the 10-year stays at 2.30 [percent interest rate] and it would stay there for 10 years, you would regret very much not having bought stocks now,” Buffett said in February. “The one thing I’m sure of is that overtime, stocks from this level will beat bonds from this level,” Buffett told “Squawk Box” October 2017. “Stocks [have] been so much more attractive than bonds for a long time now.” 4. You can’t time the market “You’re making a terrible mistake if you stay out of a game that you think is going to be very good over time because you think you can pick a better time to enter it,” he told “Squawk Box” in February 2017. 5. There’s no room to be emotional “Some people should not own stocks at all because they just get too upset with price fluctuations. If you’re gonna do dumb things because your stock goes down, you shouldn’t own a stock at all,” said Buffett told “Squawk Box” in February 2018. By comparison, “If you buy your house at $20,000 and somebody comes along the next day and says, ’I’ll pay you $15,000, you don’t sell it because the quote’s [$15,000],” added. “Some people are not actually emotionally or psychologically fit to own stocks, but I think that more of them would be,” Buffett said, if they were more educated on what they were really buying, which is part of a business. About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/2OIdwqJ #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #StockMarketTips 5 of Warren Buffett’s best tips for investing in the stock market | CNBC Make It.
Views: 114630 CNBC Make It.
Kevin O'Leary: How To Negotiate, From Salary To Cable Bill
 
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"Squeeze heads every time you can." » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf On ABC's "Shark Tank," Shark Kevin O'Leary is known as one of the toughest negotiators on the show, digging his heels in on deals he thinks are fair and fearlessly pushing for what he believes he deserves. And he's got some good advice on how you can negotiate for the things you want in your own life too, whether it's your salary or your cable bill. "You know, in life, you'd be surprised if you ask for things, sometimes you get them," O'Leary tells CNBC Make It. "Squeeze heads every time you can. Yeah, it sounds like work, but it's worth it." Negotiating your salary While O'Leary says as an entrepreneur he's never asked for a raise — "The only person I've ever asked for a raise from is me, and I was very accommodating," he jokes — he's been on the other side of the table. O'Leary says when it comes to salary, wait until you've been at your job for at least a year and have been doing well, then speak up. First, arm yourself with the facts, says O'Leary. Research what other people are making at your level in your industry and sector. Understand what the highest and lowest salary is and then aim to get yourself in the top 25 percent of that range. "If you're doing a good job [at your job], you want to start asking for more," O'Leary says. "They expect you to ask for more. If you don't ask for it, you won't get it." Negotiating your bills With something more simple, like your cable bill, play hardball for a better package or fewer fees. For example, if you are paying for channels you don't watch, "call up your provider and say, 'Tell me about your other packages, because if you don't give me a better deal, I'm leaving,'" O'Leary says. "I've done this my whole life," he says. "Believe me, they will hop to. They want to know what it's going to take to keep you as a customer, and you want a reduction in fees. You're going to find a happy medium pretty quickly. You'd be surprised. "Your job is to squeeze a cost cut and a savings out of them," says O'Leary. "You can do it. It works." In terms of bigger loans — like a mortgage or business loan — O'Leary says you can try to negotiate your way out of lender's fees. Start by saying you simply don't want to pay the fee, O'Leary suggests, and if they don't budge, offer half of what they are asking for. You'd be amazed at what you can get simply if you just ask for it, he says. "You can push back hard on that," O'Leary says. "They want to loan you the money because the core profit is the interest they charge you." About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/2OIdwqJ #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt 'Shark Tank's' Kevin O'Leary: This is how to negotiate, from your salary to your cable bill | CNBC Make It.
Views: 64079 CNBC Make It.
Figure Skater Adam Rippon Made A $6,000 Pre-Olympics Splurge — Here's Why
 
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Adam Rippon explains why he bought himself a Cartier Love bracelet a year before the Olympics. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt Figure Skater Adam Rippon Made A $6,000 Pre-Olympics Splurge — Here's Why | CNBC Make It.
Views: 48788 CNBC Make It.
What It's Like To Drive For Uber, Lyft And Juno
 
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Al is a full-time rideshare driver in New York City. Here's what a typical day on the job looks like. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf Al Castillo doesn’t have a traditional job. As a full-time rideshare driver in New York City, his office is his 2017 Honda Pilot. Castillo, 33, started driving for apps like Uber, Lyft and Juno about four years ago, and he’s been driving professionally for much longer. Before ridesharing took off in New York City, he drove school buses for seven years. He also drove for taxi service companies, which is how many New Yorkers got from point A to point B before Uber arrived in May 2011. What’s it really like to drive full-time in one of the busiest cities in America? I spent a day on the road with Castillo to find out. The hours Castillo typically works six days a week, Monday through Saturday. On weekdays, he starts driving between 6 and 7 am and finishes up between 4 and 5 pm. That’s nine to 11 hours a day. On Saturday, he starts his day a little later, between 8 and 9 am. On this particular morning, a Wednesday, he was “feeling sleepy,” he tells me, and left his home in Brooklyn at 7 am. First, though, he grabbed breakfast at Dunkin’ Donuts. The flexibility that comes with being your own boss makes up for the long hours, says Castillo. The father of three schedules his day so that he can be home in time to pick his kids up from school, help with homework and have a family dinner. The earnings On a typical day, Castillo brings home $250. If he works Monday to Saturday, that’s $1,500 per week, which comes out to about $6,000 a month. He earns an additional $100 to $300 per month by using Cargo, which pays him a monthly rate for selling products like snacks and headphones to passengers, and Play Octopus, which pays him to mount a tablet that offers trivia games and plays ads. That means, theoretically, he’s earning $72,000 a year from rides and between $1,200 and $3,600 a year from Cargo and Play Octopus, for a total of about $75,000 before taxes. Castillo gets paid per ride and his earnings depend on how long the trip is, how much distance he covers and whether or not there’s “surge pricing,” which is when demand for rides is high and prices for passengers goes up. Surge pricing, or “prime time,” as Lyft calls it, tends to happen during rush hour, bad weather or if there’s a big event going on in the area. Castillo and I check in on his earnings periodically. A mid-morning, 22-minute UberX trip earns him nearly $10. The app doesn’t show how much the customer paid — it just breaks down Castillo’s take: He earns a base rate (what you’re paid to start the ride) of $1.83, a time rate (what you earn per minute in your region) of $5.49, and a distance rate (what you earn per mile in your region) of $2. Total: $9.32. Uber and Lyft both collect about 30 percent of all passenger fares, Castillo tells me. Juno takes just 16 percent, but it’s not as popular an app yet, he adds. Sure enough, we don’t get one call from Juno over the course of the day and, instead, flip back and forth between Uber and Lyft. He has all three because, depending on what neighborhood he’s driving in, one app may be busier than the others. “People in Bed Stuy [Brooklyn] like to use Lyft,” he says. “If you’re in Queens, people like Juno.” The more rides he completes, the more he gets paid, so “you want to be busy all the time,” he tells me. “Our time is money.” Read more about being a ride-share driver here: https://cnb.cx/2sX9jWf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/2OIdwqJ #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #Rideshare A day in the life of an Uber, Lyft and Juno driver who makes about $6,000 a month in NYC | CNBC Make It.
Views: 400207 CNBC Make It.
What It's Like To Work At Chick-Fil-A
 
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Frying chicken is not as easy as it seems. Here’s what it’s like to work at one of the busiest Chick-fil-A locations in America. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf In 1967, Truett Cathy opened the first Chick-fil-A in Atlanta’s Greenbriar Mall. The menu offered just a few classics, including its famous chicken sandwich, which sold for $0.59. Over the past five decades, Chick-fil-A has gone from a cult favorite to a dominating presence on the fast food scene. The chicken chain now employs 120,000 people in 2,300 restaurants across 47 states, including New York. It first opened its doors to New Yorkers in October 2015, at the corner of 6th Avenue and 37th street in midtown Manhattan. This particular location is one of the busiest in the nation, says franchise owner Oscar Fittipaldi. He owned a Chick-fil-A in Philadelphia before being selected among hundreds of applicants to be the brand’s first Manhattan franchisee. In Philly, Fittipaldi’s restaurant completed about 900 transactions on the busiest days of the week, he tells me, but in New York, “we do 3,500 transactions on the busiest days.” What’s it like to actually work there? I decided to find out. To keep up with the demand, Fittipaldi has hired more than 125 team members, including assistant director Monique Mendoza, who let me shadow her during her 6 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday shift. Mendoza, 22, has been with Chick-fil-A for seven years — she started behind the counter as a teen in Utah and worked her way up to her current managerial position. Before the sun is up, I head over to the original NYC joint to start my day behind the scenes. Once there, I put on my head-to-toe uniform, which included a hat, red polo and non-slip shoes. Now I’m ready. Read more about Kathleen's day at Chick-fil-A here: https://cnb.cx/2FLmNxS About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/2OIdwqJ #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #ChickFilA Here’s what it’s like to work at one of the busiest Chick-fil-A locations in America | CNBC Make It.
Views: 555577 CNBC Make It.
Kevin O'Leary: This Is My Morning Routine
 
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Kevin O'Leary shares his daily morning routine and how many calories he consumes per day. "I wake up at 4:30 a.m.," O'Leary said during a July 16 question and answer session on CNBC Make It's Instagram. Many successful CEOs wake up before the sun: Apple CEO Tim Cook is awake at 3:45 a.m., while Ellevest CEO Sallie Krawcheck and Pepsi CEO Indra Nooyi are up by 4:00. And there may be some evidence that waking up early can help you succeed, psychologist Josh Davis tells The Wall Street Journal. "When you have peace and quiet and you're not concerned with people trying to get your attention, you're dramatically more effective and can get important work done," Davis explains. Although O'Leary usually sleeps six hours at night (which is less than the Center for Disease Control recommends) he takes power naps throughout the day. "My secret power is napping anywhere," he says. "I squeeze in a lot of 20-minute power snoozes." Each morning, O'Leary says he tries to get 45 minutes worth of cardio exercise in before he heads to work. Wealthy people tend to prioritize exercise, according to Tom Corley, author of "Change Your Habits, Change Your Life," who found that 76 percent of the rich exercise for at least 30 minutes every day. Richard Branson, Oprah Winfrey and Mark Zuckerberg all say exercise helps them be productive during the day. "Staying in shape is very important," Zuckerberg wrote in a Facebook Q&A. "Doing anything well requires energy, and you just have a lot more energy when you're fit." » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt Kevin O'Leary: This Is My Morning Routine
Views: 38552 CNBC Make It.
How Instant Pot Became An Amazon Best Seller – The Upstarts
 
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Robert Wang just wants to be the Steve Jobs of kitchen appliances. And he may just achieve that. Much like Jobs with the iPhone and other Apple products, Wang has created a product with great attention to detail that has inspired cult-like devotion: Instant Pot. Introducing The Upstarts, a new series about the companies you love that came out of nowhere and are now everywhere. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf Millions of fervent foodies have purchased an Instant Pot multicooker, making it one of the top-selling products sold in Amazon's Prime Day sales events in July 2016, with 215,000 Instant Pot 7-in-1 Multi-Functional Pressure Cookers sold, in 2017, and in 2018, when Instant Pot broke its own Prime Day record with 300,000 units sold over 36 hours. The company expects to be among the best-selling products on Amazon during the already busy holiday sales season too. More than 5.5 million people follow an Instant Pot-related account on Facebook — 1.5 million follow Instant Pot's official Facebook page alone — where they gush over the product and swap recipes (from pot roast to cheesecake and yogurt) as well as user tips. And recently, in a pitch-perfect example of how Instant Pot has penetrated the zeitgeist, rising young political star and newly elected New York congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (who's been dubbed the most relatable politician ever) has even started having Instagram Live conversations about politics with her 780,000 followers over an Instant Pot. Earlier this month she held court while making Instant Pot macaroni and cheese, and a few days later, she asked her 1.2 million Twitter followers to submit their favorite Instant Pot recipes for future chats. If you're one of the few who has not yet used the gadget (as a rice cooker, yogurt maker, browning pan, steamer or warming pot, among its other functions), it's likely you've at least been on the receiving end of some Instant Pot proselytizing from one of its many devotees: a Bloomberg critic called it "a magical pot" and Slate compared the product's faithful following to a "religion." This is all according to the master plan of Wang, 54, who tells CNBC Make It that, in addition to worshipping Jobs, he's also trying to follow the example of tech titan Bill Gates and "put Instant Pot in every kitchen" (a nod to Gates' famous promise to put a computer in every home in the early days of Microsoft). "It was a very ambitious statement [and] kind of laughable at the time," says Wang, who made the proclamation in a 2013 mission statement when he had just four or five employees. "But now it looks very much attainable." Today, Ottawa, Ontario-based Instant Brands (which changed its name from Double Insight in May 2018) has nearly 90 employees and there seems to be no end in sight to its record-setting sales. But it all started after Wang lost his job in 2008. Wang had been the chief scientist at a mobile messaging company he'd co-founded in 2000, but the company's CEO shut down Wang's division, putting Wang out of the job (the company, Airwide Solutions, was later sold off). Despite having spent 14 years working on telecommunications technology, Wang decided to turn his attention toward solving a personal problem he had been pondering. Wang and his wife, Tracy, both worked full time in the tech industry (his wife at telecom Nortel Networks, where Robert also used to work), which left them with a very relatable problem: They had little time to cook fast, tasty and healthy meals for their two young children, who were then 4 and 8, he tells CNBC Make It. "We did a lot of takeout, fast food. Kids really love fast food," Wang says. "But my wife and myself don't think that's the way to raise our kids. So, at that point, I was dreaming about an automated cooking machine, which will help me cook [a] healthy dinner after work." Read more about Instant Pot and Robert Wang here: https://cnb.cx/2BAS2Hz About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/2OIdwqJ #CyberMonday #CNBCMakeIt #InstantPot How Instant Pot became a kitchen appliance with a cult following and a best-seller on Amazon | CNBC Make It.
Views: 581907 CNBC Make It.
Kevin O'Leary: Don't Buy All That Crap You Don't Need
 
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"Shark Tank" star Kevin O'Leary says he made this mistake in his 20s, but he's learned his lesson, and so can you. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf “Shark Tank” star Kevin O’Leary is a successful businessman and financier, but like most people, he’s made his fair share of mistakes, including gambling away his money in his early 20s in Las Vegas. But the top advice 60-year-old O’Leary would give to his 20-year-old self is pretty simple: “Don’t buy all that crap you don’t need,” O’Leary tells CNBC Make It. “I think about all the crap I bought that I never used. I mean it’s amazing,” he says. “All the shoes, all the pants, all of the shirts that I never wore after the first time I bought them. What a waste of money. “I could have had that money making 7 or 8 percent in perpetuity” by investing it, O’Leary says. It’s the same reason O’Leary refuses to pay even $2.50 for a cup of coffee; he knows if he makes that coffee at home for pennies, he can put the savings to better use. O’Leary frequently preaches the importance of saving and investing, and recommends that young people harness the magic of compounding returns. “When you’re 21 years old, or 20 or 18 or 19 and you start putting aside 10 percent of what you make, [you could have] over $1,000,000 by the time you’re 65,” O’Leary previously told CNBC Make It. “If no one else is going to worry about your retirement, I want you to worry about it.” O’Leary has added a string of zeros to the number of dollars in his bank account since he was 20, so he is now personally willing to spend on investment pieces that will last for years and on his favorite splurge, $150 underwear. But that doesn’t mean he’s wasteful. O’Leary tells CNBC Make It he only wears four pairs of shoes — two pairs of Prada shoes, a pair of flip flops and a pair of sneakers for working out. “I started off with probably 100 pairs of shoes. It’s like the Imelda Marcos problem,” O’Leary says, referring to the corrupt former first lady of the Philippines, who was famously known for her excessive shoe collection. “You don’t need that problem.” “So if you’re 20 — listen to what Mr. Wonderful is saying here — you don’t need 50 shirts,” he says. You only need a handful of essentials, which he says includes six t-shirts, three pairs of jeans and three baseball caps. About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/2OIdwqJ #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #KevinOLeary This is the No. 1 piece of advice Kevin O’Leary would give his younger self — and it would have saved him a lot of money | CNBC Make It.
Views: 24202 CNBC Make It.
Bill Gates in 1989 On His Hiring Process, Microsoft's Seattle Area Office
 
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In a 1989 NBC "Today Show" interview, Bill Gates explains why he chose not to locate his company in Silicon Valley. He also shares what he was looking for in job candidates. At the time, Microsoft had just over 4,000 employees. If you wanted a job with Microsoft at the height of the personal computer revolution, you only needed to display two qualities — at least, that's what Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates told NBC's "Today" show in 1989. Gates, who was then just 33 years old and still CEO of the tech giant, told NBC's Jane Pauley that job candidates' age and experience were less important than their enthusiasm for work and their belief in making computers more accessible for the average person. "Well, we'll hire people at any age as long as they're super energetic and they want to make personal computers easier to use," Gates says before admitting that most new Microsoft employees were on the younger side. "But, we end up hiring mostly people right out of college or business school." Of course, new hires also needed "to be smart before they come in," Gates adds, but Microsoft also wanted bright, but malleable, candidates who could be easily trained. "We give them a lot of training on the job, we put them right to work," he says. "But, no, we don't expect that they know a lot about [the work] before they get there." In other words, in 1989, Microsoft didn't exactly expect every job candidate to be as adept at writing software as the company's co-founders — Gates and Paul Allen developed the programming language software that launched Microsoft in 1975. New hires were expected to be smart, enthusiastic and ready to learn. Gates also tells Pauley why the company was headquartered in the Seattle area instead of Silicon Valley. First, said Gates, "I grew up in Seattle, so as soon as my company had over 20 people, I decided to move it back here." (He and Paul Allen co-founded the company in Albuquerque, New Mexico.) But also, "in California, in Silicon Valley, ... a lot of things happen but the rumor mill makes it hard to keep secrets and employees switch from company to company," he says. In Seattle, "we're able to keep our secrets and, you know, be really on our own," Gates says in the interview. Check out CNBC Make It for more on Bill Gates: https://cnb.cx/2TXpimF » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #BillGates Bill Gates in 1989 On His Hiring Process, Microsoft's Seattle Area Office
Views: 87798 CNBC Make It.
Kevin O'Leary: What To Do When The Stock Market Surges
 
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Take the emotion out of it and hold steady. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf When the market surges, it is easy to get caught up in the financial frenzy and be tempted to sell your stocks that are up. But financial guru and star of ABC’s “Shark Tank,” Kevin O’Leary, has different advice: Take the emotion out of it and hold steady. “Sometimes, there’s exuberance in the market and investors are willing to pay more, sometimes when they get concerned and they’re risk averse, they want to pay less. That’s called volatility,” O’Leary tells CNBC Make It. “Very often, this is an emotional decision.” But “You shouldn’t try and time the market,” O’Leary says. “When the market soars, it’s not necessarily time to sell. When the market collapses, it’s not always time to buy.” Instead, says O’Leary, “Take a small portion of your income every month and invest it. That’s averaging in. That’s the idea.” O’Leary suggests investing 5 to 10 percent of your income. He says what everybody should understand about the stock market is that “it has its own forces at play; nobody can control it. Every day, the world makes decisions on what they want to pay for any stock.” That can be maddening, O’leary says, but it’s not something to be too concerned about because companies and the economy ultimately grow over time, and so will the market in the long term. Indeed, the S&P 500 index has earned an annual average return of 9.8 percent over the past 90 years. “Price swings of up to 30 and 40 percent are not uncommon in the stock market when you look over 100 years of history,” O’Leary says. “So when you see a violent day where the stocks go down 5 or 6 percent; get over it. It’s normal. In fact, not having volatility is not normal.” That’s why investing regularly is important. “Sometimes you’ll buy stocks and they’re very cheap. Sometimes you’ll pay more for them,” he says. “But if you’re averaging over time, that’s a very good long-term strategy.” About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/2OIdwqJ #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #StockMarket Kevin O’Leary: This is what you should do when the stock market surges | CNBC Make It.
Views: 17763 CNBC Make It.
How This Couple Retired Early With Over $1 Million
 
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The typical American retires in their early 60s. Here's how this couple managed to retire in their 30s. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf Justin McCurry, a father of three based in Raleigh, North Carolina, quit his engineering job in 2013 and retired at age 33. His wife, Kaisorn, joined him in early retirement in 2016 at age 38. "Neither of us ever reached a six figure salary, with my salary topping out at $69,000 and [Kaisorn's] at $74,000," Justin writes on his blog, Root of Good, which explains how he saved more than $1 million in 10 years to retire early. "No winning lottery tickets or inheritances, either," he says. "Just steady saving and investing in our low cost index fund portfolio year after year." Their journey to early retirement began in 2004, when Justin graduated from law school and landed a job at an engineering consulting firm. Kaisorn was still in law school, meaning their combined annual income was Justin's $48,000 salary. They had a good bit in savings already: Between the two of them, they had accumulated $49,000 from investments during college and grad school. Over the next decade, thanks to incremental raises and careful saving and investing, their portfolio grew to more than $1.3 million, enough to support their modest lifestyle in retirement. By carefully tracking their expenses and living frugally in Raleigh, "every year we saved more than half of our income," Justin tells CNBC Make It. At their peak earning period, they were making a combined $138,000 and saving up to 70 percent of it. They didn't just save a ton of money — they put their money to work. "We consistently pumped our savings into 401(k)'s, IRA's, HSA's, 529's, and regular brokerage accounts," Justin writes. "These investments grew enormously over roughly 10 years and made us financially independent today." You can see a detailed breakdown of how their money grew from 2004 to 2014 on their blog. It's been five years since Justin left the workforce and two years since Kaisorn followed suit. CNBC Make It, which profiled the couple in April 2017, checked back in with the McCurry family and asked about life in early retirement. Originally, the McCurrys set their retirement budget at $32,000 a year, which they stuck to in 2014 and 2015. But the budget isn't set in stone. In 2016, for example, the McCurrys revisited their portfolio and realized they could increase their retirement budget to $40,000 a year. On the flip side, they can "always trim back on spending in some areas if our investment portfolio performed really poorly or we had an unexpected expense in one category," Justin says. Flexibility is key in early retirement, he adds: "You may have to spend less if the markets go down. Or, you may be able to spend more than what you originally budgeted for. ... As long as you're OK cutting back on some of the wants if your portfolio goes down, then you can still cover your needs without worrying about depleting your assets prematurely." Even after the McCurry's started having kids in 2005, they managed to maintain a high savings rate by taking advantage of the benefits offered by their companies, having family help out with child care and using hand-me-downs. Today, their kids are six, 12 and 13, and they all attend public school. Plus, "we don't go overboard when there's the big study abroad, expensive field trips," he says. "Instead of spending $2,000 or $3,000 to send one of the kids to Spain for a week, we would spend that same amount of money, or less, and to go to Spain for the entire family." The couple has already started planning for college costs by setting aside "several years of tuition for each one of them," says Justin. It's "not a full ride," he notes, but "I don't think it's necessarily a foregone conclusion that we would pay 100 percent of the price." Justin estimates that they spend "probably one-half or one-third of what most people report spending on kids." About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/2OIdwqJ #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #RetireEarly This couple who retired in their 30s with over $1 million are living their best lives | CNBC Make It.
Views: 49641 CNBC Make It.
Meet NYSE's Only Full-Time Female Trader
 
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Working in an industry where you are one of very few women can be challenging enough — but imagine what it's like to be the only woman on staff. That's the case for New York Stock Exchange trader Lauren Simmons. The 23-year-old is an equity trader for Rosenblatt Securities, and she is both the youngest and the only full-time female employee to hold that position at the NYSE. "When I tell people what my job is they are always surprised," she tells CNBC Make It. In fact, Simmons says that if you had told her five years ago that she'd end up working on Wall Street, she wouldn't have believed the news herself. "It's surreal," she says. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt Meet NYSE's Only Full-Time Female Trader | CNBC Make It.
Views: 80867 CNBC Make It.
He Went From Debt To Running A $62.5MM Startup
 
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Rodney Williams left a comfortable job at Procter & Gamble to launch LISNR, a software technology that transmits data over near ultrasonic sound waves. The company is now valued at $62.5 million. Rodney Williams left a cushy corporate gig with a six-figure salary to build a start-up that sunk him six figures in debt. Now, that business, Lisnr, has raised millions of dollars in funding, has almost 40 employees and counts the likes of the NFL's Dallas Cowboys and NBC as clients. The journey taught Williams, 34, a lot about success. In 2010, Williams was working in the marketing department for consumer product giant Procter & Gamble selling Pampers online. He had graduated from West Virginia University in 2006 and had gotten his MBA at Howard University in 2009, according to his LinkedIn account. From there, Williams was a financial analyst at Lockheed Martin until he landed the job he didn’t know he was looking for at P&G. “I wasn't actually looking for a marketing job. I was actually looking for a finance job,” Williams tells CNBC Make It about how he ended up hawking diapers in Cincinnati. “But [Procter & Gamble] felt that I had an opportunity be a great marketer and to lead the thinking from a digital aspect. When I got there, I focused on what I did well, which is technology. I wrote patents. I launched brands on social. I led e-commerce. I led a lot of the digital activities.” » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt He Went From Debt To Running A $62.5MM Startup | CNBC Make It.
Views: 28565 CNBC Make It.
How To Become A Millionaire – Scott Galloway
 
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Scott Galloway stresses that your passive income must be greater than your "burn" to become truly rich. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/2OIdwqJ #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt Scott Galloway: You can live rich on a $50,000 salary with this simple money strategy | CNBC Make It.
Views: 25522 CNBC Make It.
How Casper Became A $1 Billion Mattress Start-Up — The Upstarts
 
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"When Kylie Jenner posted about Casper I think it broke our website." Introducing The Upstarts, a new series about the companies you love that came out of nowhere and are now everywhere. People typically didn't get overly excited about their mattresses until Casper showed up five years ago. Casper is the online mattress startup that launched in 2014 and quickly became a social media phenomenon, with celebrities like Kylie Jenner showing off pictures of their new mattresses on Instagram and YouTube influencers posting "unboxing" videos where they excitedly pull a new Casper mattress out of a cardboard box after it arrived on their doorsteps. "Oh my God, when Kylie Jenner posted about Casper I think it broke our website," says Neil Parikh, one of Casper's co-founders, about Jenner's March 2015 Instagram post, which garnered more than 870,000 likes. Today, Casper is a billion-dollar mattress company leading the charge of online retailers disrupting an industry previously dominated by companies selling mattresses out of large warehouses. Casper's sales keep growing year-to-year and the company is even rumored to be getting ready to launch an IPO. But, before Casper launched five years ago, the company's five co-founders struggled to convince investors that an online mattress startup could be the next big idea. But Parikh and his fellow co-founders (including the CEO, Philip Krim, along with T. Luke Sherwin, Jeff Chapin and Gabriel Flateman) were convinced that they could help revolutionize the nearly $39 billion global mattress industry by designing a high-quality, custom multi-layer foam mattress that could be squeezed into a three-and-a-half foot-tall box and shipped across North America. (Casper mattresses start at $350 and go as high as $2,750, and you can try them out with a free, 100-day trial.) Without any significant outside investments, Casper's founders first had to put up their own money and when that ran out use their own credit cards to pay for the most basic start-up costs, including manufacturing the first sample mattresses and paying to ship them to prospective investors. "We were just, like, racking up debt. We put, like $50,000 to $100,000 on our credit cards, which probably was irresponsible. But, we were all in," Parikh tells CNBC Make It. Casper's founders finally won over a group of venture capital investors who believed in the idea enough to give them $1.85 million in seed funding to get the idea off the ground in January 2014. The company officially launched in April 2014 and, even to the surprise of its founders, Casper sold out its entire inventory of mattresses (which, at the time, was still just 40 beds) on the first day the company's website went live. The founders then had to scramble to fulfill those early orders. They waited for a truck full of Casper mattresses to travel from Casper's manufacturer, in Georgia, to their headquarters in New York City so they could quickly package them and ship them to customers. Parikh and the other Casper founders had expected to sell about $1.8 million worth of mattresses in their first year, but instead they hit that number in just two months. That early success helped attract more money from big-name investors — including celebrities like Leonardo DiCaprio, Ashton Kutcher, Nas and 50 Cent — which, in turn, helped spread word about the brand. In 2017, retail giant Target reportedly looked into buying Casper for $1 billion, but instead invested a reported $75 million in the company and started selling Casper products in its stores. Since launching, Casper has raised nearly $340 million from investors, and the company is currently valued at $1.1 billion, Casper said last month. In 2018, Casper topped $400 million in annual revenue, the company says. That number is likely to continue growing in 2019, which could also be the first year that Casper reaches profitability, as the costs of growing the startup have reportedly outweighed its increasing revenue streams. Meanwhile, Casper's success has helped spawn a king-sized list of rivals, like Leesa Sleep and Purple Innovation, as well as fellow direct-to-consumer brands like Tuft & Needle and Eight Sleep. Read more about the rise of Casper here: https://cnb.cx/2IhtWWm » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/2OIdwqJ #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #Casper How Casper’s founders went from $100,000 in debt to building a billion-dollar mattress start-up | CNBC Make It.
Views: 156480 CNBC Make It.
Neil DeGrasse Tyson Simplifies Bill Gates' Net Worth
 
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People are fascinated by wealth, but do they really understand it? » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf For instance, publications like Forbes and Bloomberg publish running lists of the world’s richest people — multi-billionaires like Amazon founder Jeff Bezos ($131 billion net worth, according to Bloomberg), Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates ($94 billion) and investor Warren Buffett ($87 billion). But, while many of us are endlessly intrigued by how these titans of industry managed to amass their eye-popping wealth, it can be difficult for the average person to fully appreciate just how much money that really is. Fortunately, renowned astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson has a handy way of explaining the massive gap between the average person’s net worth and that of a person like Bill Gates. In order to illustrate just how wealthy Gates is compared to the average person, deGrasse Tyson tells CNBC Make It that he once did an experiment to determine how much found money would need to be laying on the street for someone as wealthy as Gates to take the time to bend over and pick it up. Tyson uses himself finding a penny as an example: “Since I have a stable job and a car, the penny — I’m not bending down to pick up the penny,” deGrasse Tyson, who is director of the Hayden Planetarium in New York and the host of “StarTalk ” on National Geographic Channel tells CNBC Make It. “Let somebody else get that.” “Same with a nickel. [A] dime? If I’m not in a hurry, I’m picking up the dime; in a hurry, I’m walking past. “A quarter I’m picking up every time.” So what about Gates? When deGrasse Tyson did the experiment in 2011, Gates’ net worth was around $50 billion, deGrasse Tyson tells CNBC Make It. The astrophysicist did a calculation that took into account his own personal net worth compared to Gates’ considerably larger assets, and he then used that ratio to determine Gates’ version of the quarter that deGrasse Tyson would be willing to pick up. The answer: Gates would not pick up anything less than $45,000, the scientist tells CNBC Make It. For some added perspective, the median household income in the U.S. was just over $61,000 last year, so $45,000 would be nearly three-quarters of the median income for an American household. “So, if there’s a wad of cash, $45,000, in the street, [Gates might say] ‘No, I’m too busy, let someone else pick that up!’” deGrasse Tyson says while chuckling. “That’s how much wealth $50 billion is, because the $45,000 is not even worth bending over to pick up.” Now, of course, Gates’ net worth is nearly double what it was seven years ago, so it’s likely that it would take closer to six figures to get the former Microsoft CEO to stop walking. About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/2OIdwqJ #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt Neil deGrasse Tyson used this experiment to put in perspective just how rich Bill Gates really is | CNBC Make It.
Views: 82541 CNBC Make It.
Tony Robbins: My Biggest Splurge
 
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"At different stages of your life, what feels like a splurge changes. ... I can remember when it was a big deal that I could go to all-you-could-eat smorgasbord," says self-made millionaire Tony Robbins. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf Tony Robbins didn’t always have the cash to splurge. “I grew up dirt poor,” he tells CNBC Make It. “We were always broke and trying to get by.” And so, “early in my life, I thought, ‘I’m going to make enough money that my family will never have to worry about this. I’m going to find a way to succeed.’” Robbins did just that: He has built a multimillion-dollar fortune as an entrepreneur, investor and business strategist. Along with his success, “I’ve had a few” significant, memorable splurges, he says. Perhaps his biggest one was when he was in his 20s and first started making big money. “I was about 24, 25 years old,” he recalls. “I’d built a company that had become pretty successful and I had a really amazing economic month where I made half a million dollars in a month, which was incredible at the time. “And I always had wanted to go to Fiji. I always wanted to have an island but I couldn’t afford it. And then I saw an opportunity at a place I loved” to invest in some property there, he says. “I wanted to just try and buy one little condo at this place and they wouldn’t do it, so I put the money in as a small investor in this resort and then my partners went upside down and it was the middle of a recession — I was really young, just getting my business going and it was a tough time during that time, but I wasn’t willing to let it go. “I found a way, by hook or by crook, to figure out how to keep it together and make the payments.” His doggedness paid off: “Today, I have about 525 acres and three miles of ocean frontage in the top resort in the country,” Robbins says. The Namale Resort and Spa in Fiji, which he bought at age 29 for $12.5 million, is now valued at $52 million. He also splurged on a beach condo for his mom. “I’ll never forget” the day he surprised her with the home, he says. “That moment of just shock at first … and then tears pouring down her face. “My mom’s been gone now for more than a decade and it’s still one of the most treasured moments of my life.” He points out that “at different stages of your life, what feels like a splurge changes, and I think it’s really important never to lose the awe that you felt when you suddenly had a privilege or an ability.” “I can remember when it was a big deal that I could go to all-you-could-eat smorgasbord,” Robbins adds. “To be able to take three friends and pay for it was a huge splurge.” The most memorable splurges aren’t always the ones for yourself, he says: “I’ve had the privilege to have a plane and do all kinds of things and they all have added value in my life in some way, but the greatest splurges are the ones where you splurge on the people you love because that has infinite value, infinite joy to you, and even when they’re gone it will bring joy to your life.” That’s why he encourages spending on others when you can. Sure, “certainly splurge on yourself,” he says. “You deserve it. You work hard. But maybe find who else you would want to splurge on and find what that feels like.” About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/2OIdwqJ #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #TonyRobbins Self-made millionaire Tony Robbins shares the biggest and most memorable splurges of his life | CNBC Make It.
Views: 31066 CNBC Make It.
Here's How To Get Rich Selling Stuff On Amazon
 
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In 2011, Larry Lubarsky was $100,000 in debt and living with his mom in Brooklyn. Now, he's making millions of dollars a year reselling anything from shampoo to Nerf toys on Amazon. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf Nerf guns saved Larry Lubarsky's life. Well, not just Nerf guns. But also lozenges, shampoo and cookies and the thousands of items he sells on Amazon as a third-party seller. Seven years ago, Larry Lubarsky was a 31-year-old high school dropout who had no money saved and was $100,000 in debt. Today, he's 38 and running a company that has 10 employees and brought in $18 million last year selling thousands of different products on Amazon. "I was living with my mom, I was severely in debt, I couldn't afford my phone, my car. I couldn't afford to, you know, take a girl out on a date, anything like that," Lubarsky tells CNBC Make It. "So, it saved my life financially." Lubarsky buys products — like electronics, beauty supplies or toys — in bulk and then re-sells them on Amazon for a profit. For example, if Lubarsky sees Nerf gun selling for $20 a piece on Amazon, he will buy hundreds or thousands of the toy for $10 per unit wholesale, then sell them on Amazon and for a profit $5 per toy (after Amazon's fee's are taken out), he says. Of course, that's assuming it's a desirable product that people will buy. "Basically, we're looking for that one percent of products from the thousands that you look at that actually sell well and have a nice profit," Lubarsky tells CNBC Make It. At any given time, Lubarsky's business will have nearly 3,000 total products listed on the Amazon Marketplace and he sells, on average, anywhere from 1,500 to 2,000 orders per day between the US and Europe. Last year, the business brought in $18 million in revenue, including a net profit of $4 million, and Lubarsky says he's looking to reach $20 million in revenue in 2018. In 2011, Lubarsky "hit rock bottom," he says. "I was dead broke, I kind of felt that my life really wasn't going anywhere, and I was in a really bad place." Born and raised in Brooklyn, Lubarsky dropped out of high school to become a stockbroker at 17 and had spent over a decade selling stocks, but the financial crisis of 2008 and its aftermath took a toll and left him over $100,000 in debt. Without a dollar to his name, Lubarsky moved in with his mother and started looking for any work he could find at pizzerias and other local businesses, any 9-to-5 job where he could earn "500 bucks a week to just pay my regular bills and start paying off some of the debt," he says. In 2012, a friend who owned an optical store in Brooklyn hired Lubarsky to answer the phone for about $500 per week. As it turned out, that same friend had a side-business buying sunglasses and eyeglasses wholesale and then selling them on Amazon as one of the site's roughly 300,000 third-party sellers in the US. "I had no idea that selling on Amazon was even a thing," Lubarsky says of his first brush with the business. "I didn't even know that even existed." But "When I picked up a product and saw that, 'Hey, I can buy this for $10 and I can sell it on Amazon for $20 and make 10 bucks in the process, and it's selling five [or] six times a day,' — that's when the light bulb went off for me. And, that's when I realized, you know, that I can scale this business out." Lubarsky helped his friend expand his business to Amazon UK and run it in exchange for a "small cut" of the profits. Within a year, Lubarsky's piece of the business was bringing in "a couple of million dollars annually," he says. The windfall from his cut of that Amazon business got Lubarsky back on his feet. He rented his own apartment in Brooklyn and in 2014, used his newly acquired expertise to launch his own Amazon business. "I knew everything that needed to be done in order to get the business off the ground," Lubarsky tells CNBC Make It. The only thing he needed was seed money. So, Lubarsky pitched his idea to a few friends before one (who Lubarsky declines to name for privacy reasons) believed in the idea enough to invest $60,000. Lubarsky spent $10,000 on shipping supplies and the rent for a small, one-bedroom house in Brooklyn where Lubarsky started working out of the garage. Read more of Larry's story here: https://cnb.cx/2EAJXo9 About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/2OIdwqJ #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #Amazon How this high school dropout went from $100K in debt to bringing in $18M selling stuff on Amazon | CNBC Make It.
Views: 70606 CNBC Make It.
Billionaire Warren Buffett On His Successful Relationship With Charlie Munger
 
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Warren Buffett and business partner Charlie Munger have worked together for over four decades. The two billionaire investors share the secrets to their lasting, and successful, relationship. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf “We’ve never had an argument in the entire time we’ve known each other, which is almost 60 years,” Buffett said of Munger in an interview with CNBC’s “Squawk Box” in 2018. Munger, who is Buffett’s right-hand man in his role as the vice chairman of Berkshire Hathaway (Buffett is the chairman and CEO), has known the billionaire investor since 1959. The two men have worked together since 1978, when Munger left his own investment practice to join Berkshire Hathaway. More than a decade earlier, Buffett had convinced Munger to leave his law practice (Munger co-founded the law firm Munger, Tolles & Olson), because “it didn’t use his full talents,” Buffett told CNBC. Buffett and Munger both grew up in Omaha, Nebraska, (hence Buffett’s nickname, the “Oracle of Omaha”) where they both worked at a grocery store owned by Buffett’s grandfather, though they did not work there at the same time. They didn’t get to know one another until a mutual acquaintance brought them together, when Munger was 35 and Buffett was 29. The two men had dinner together and quickly bonded. “We went to dinner and in five minutes, Charlie was rolling on the floor laughing at his own jokes — and I do the same thing,” Buffett, who is now 88, told CNBC in 2018. “We knew we were sort of made for each other,” Buffett added about Munger, who is now 95. Those feelings turned out to be correct, as the two men have stayed close friends every since. And, even after being friends for about 60 years, and working together for more than 40 years, Buffett still says he can “always learn something” from spending time with Munger. That could explain why the two friends and partners have never had an argument — though that doesn’t mean they agree on everything. “We are strong-minded, we disagree on a few things,” Buffett said. At the same time, though, Buffett added: “We agree on most things and we have a great time together.” The fact that Buffett and Munger enjoy each other’s company seems to have strengthened their working relationship, and that’s also likely why they don’t argue. “We’ve got an extremely good partnership and business is more fun — just as life is more fun — with a good personal partner and to have great business partner,” Buffett said. “You know it’s just — we’ve accomplished more but we’ve also had way more fun.” Their strong bond is also a result of mutual respect. Munger told CNBC in 2016 that he and Buffett “don’t agree totally on everything, and yet we’re quite respectful of one another.” There are “not too many people I listen to,” Buffett told CNBC. “But, Charlie, he’s given me a lot of good advice over time. And, I may hate to take it to a certain degree, but sometimes — but my decisions have been better. I’ve lived a better life because of Charlie.” Clearly, their relationship has been a successful one, judging by Berkshire Hathaway’s amazing track record of outperforming the overall stock market every year going back to the 1960s. As a result of their success together, Munger is now worth about $1.7 billion, according to a recent estimate by Forbes, while Buffett has a net worth of more than $84 billion, making him the third-wealthiest person in the world. About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/2OIdwqJ #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #WarrenBuffett Warren Buffett and Charlie Munger haven’t had a fight in 60 years — here’s why | CNBC Make It.
Views: 9558 CNBC Make It.
Meet Margo Hayes, 20-Year-Old Rock Climbing Champ
 
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Margo Hayes is shattering gender barriers and proving climbing isn’t just a man’s sport. She was the first woman to climb two of the most difficult-graded outdoor climbs in 2017 — and she’s just getting started. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf Margo Hayes is a soft-spoken 20-year-old who loves gardening and beekeeping. She's also an elite athlete, with the track record (and muscles) to prove it. Hayes is one of the top climbers in the U.S. She's excelled at the sport since she joined Boulder's Team ABC climbing squad at age 10, but she started grabbing attention when she became the first female athlete to "send" (successfully climb from the bottom of a route to the top without falling, in climbing-speak) one of the toughest-graded climbing routes in the world. In February 2017, Hayes reached the top of La Rambla, in Siurana, Spain. The highest grade in climbing is 5.15, with c being the toughest. There are currently fewer than five routes in the world rated a 5.15c. La Rambla is a confirmed 5.15a grade. No women before her had ever climbed a 5.15 on the record. It took her nearly seven days to figure out how to reach the peak. Seven months later, she made news again, climbing her second 5.15a and becoming the first woman to send Biographie/Realization in Ceuse, France, one of the most coveted climbs of its grade. Hayes was only the 15th person to climb it. "To be one of the women who helped open the door to those possibilities, that's an honor," she tells CNBC Make It. Hayes tracks her workouts, progress, travels, gratitude and "manifestations" in a bullet journal. She's been writing down her goals since age 6, when she dreamed of becoming an Olympic gymnast (she eventually abandoned the sport after suffering a series of injuries.) Hayes typically trains six days per week, climbing for two to five hours per day both indoors and outdoors, and complementing her climbs with running, strength-building and stretching. Her go-to food is sweet potatoes — she has celiac disease, so they help her get fast carbs and energy to fuel her climbs. Today, Hayes is sponsored by The North Face and four other companies: La Sportiva, Petzl, Friction Labs and Dogeared. They all afford her the opportunity to climb professionally, travel and mount the gear she needs to get her work done, from leggings to chalk. In September, Hayes competed in the International Federation of Sport Climbing World Championships in Innsbruck, Austria. She finished 1st in bouldering among American women – but 10th generally – and didn't make it on to the finals. Sport climbing will join the Olympics for the first time at the Tokyo Games in 2020. It's too early to tell whether or not Hayes will qualify, and she avoids discussing the topic. "I think it's really important to focus on the process," she says. "If you are focused on the future or on a past moment, you're not able to perform at your maximum." About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/2OIdwqJ #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt Meet the 20-year-old revolutionizing rock climbing for women | CNBC Make It.
Views: 13171 CNBC Make It.
Living On $60K A Year In NYC — Millennial Money
 
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Fallon Schwurack moved to New York City from Salt Lake City, Utah to pursue her dream of being a musical theatre dancer. To make ends meet, she works full time as a server, while attending dance auditions. Fallon says she lives very comfortably in NYC on her server income. She makes less money dancing than serving, but Fallon says her happiness is more important than her salary. Here's how she earns and spends her money. Read more about Fallon's budget breakdown here: https://cnb.cx/2UB6dDA Introducing Millennial Money, our new interview series profiling millennials in different cities and at different income levels on how they make, spend and save their money. Fallon Schwurack tried to quit dancing. She went to college and earned a degree in biology. She worked in a lab for a few years and had plans to go back to school to become a medical examiner. But then a friend asked her to dance in a show as a favor. She accepted — and fell back in love with with dancing. Schwurack first learned to dance when she was just three years old and, after graduating from high school in Salt Lake City, she spent a year dancing professionally for a local ballet company. After getting pulled back onstage, she started going to auditions and landing parts in local performances around Salt Lake. Realizing she wanted to pursue dance full-time, she abandoned her plan to go back to school. So, in 2016, one day before her 30th birthday, Schwurack moved to New York City to try and dance professionally. She works as a restaurant server to make ends meet. Now 32, she's still building her career but, she says, she's able to live "very, very comfortably" on what she makes, and "getting to be able to dance every day is one of the best feelings I've ever had." Although dance is Schwurack's passion, she acknowledges that "it's really hard, actually being a dancer in New York City." For one thing, the competition is fierce: "When I go to an audition, open calls usually have around 300 girls there at least." And when Schwurack does land a job, it's both short-term and means taking a pay cut. "You live the poor actor life unless you have certain side jobs that make the money because a lot of the contracts aren't very lasting," she says. "Even if you get on Broadway they can last for a month or two, maybe up to six months. There's a few shows that are running for years, but things change and you might leave a show even if it doesn't close." Most of Schwurack's contracts have lasted around two months and paid between $350 and $500 per week. Because she's a non-equity dancer, her rates are lower. Equity dancers earn closer to $900 per week or more, she says. When she's not dancing, Schwurack works at the restaurant Tony's Di Napoli, where she earns around $60,000 a year. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #MillennialMoney Living On $60K A Year In NYC – Millennial Money
Views: 491938 CNBC Make It.
How Sweetgreen Became A $1 Billion Salad Start-Up – The Upstarts
 
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Sweetgreen is now the restaurant world's first "unicorn," valued at over $1 billion. Started by three college friends out of their dorm room at Georgetown University, the salad company has 91 locations with more in the works and is vying to become the digital food platform of the future. Introducing The Upstarts, a new series about the companies you love that came out of nowhere and are now everywhere. Sweetgreen is the first-ever unicorn salad start-up, luring lunchtime lines across the country with its millenial- and Gen Z-friendly $12 salads. Now, the brand that brought the farm-to-table trend to fast-casual dining wants to be "the Starbucks of salads." "If I had told you 25 years ago, when Starbucks only had a few locations, that someday it would be a global phenomenon … nobody would have believed that. ... But, that's what happened," Sweetgreen investor and billionaire Steve Case told CNBC. Today, Starbucks has a market value of nearly $90 billion. "And so that's what we feel with Sweetgreen." Like Starbucks, Sweetgreen started with a single store. The brand was founded in 2007 after then-Georgetown students Jonathan Neman, Nicolas Jammet, and Nathaniel Ru (who met in an entrepreneurship class) got tired of the unhealthy and uninspiring food options around campus and decided to do something about it. "The most delicious food, the coolest food … was all the least healthy," Jammet tells CNBC Make It. "None of them made us feel that good, and we wanted to solve that problem." Neman, Jammet and Ru, all now 33, settled on the concept for Sweetgreen — fast but healthy meals that taste good and feature ingredients from local farmers — before they'd even finished taking their finals, and they hosted taste tests of future menu items with other students in Jammet's dorm room. "We even had these little anonymous surveys people could fill out," Jammet tells CNBC Make It. (An early iteration of the chain's Guacamole Greens salad was the most popular dish then, he says, and it remains one of the store's biggest fan favorites.) The friends raised over $300,000 from 50 investors — mainly family and friends — and three months after graduating, opened the first Sweetgreen in a 560-square-foot shack near the Georgetown University campus. The bathroom was bigger than the kitchen, Ru and Jammet remember. "We really had no idea what we were doing," Jammet says. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #Sweetgreen How Sweetgreen became the Starbucks of salads with a valuation of over $1 billion | CNBC Make It.
Views: 195440 CNBC Make It.
How To Succeed In Professional And Personal Life – Scott Galloway
 
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Scott Galloway stresses these tips for mastering your professional and personal life. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/2OIdwqJ #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt Scott Galloway: The two most important keys to succeed at work and in life | CNBC Make It.
Views: 9362 CNBC Make It.
Living On $100K A Year In Boston – Millennial Money
 
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Besides running his own test prep business, 25-year-old Trevor Klee is a consultant for other tutors and coaches jiu-jitsu. He lives in Boston, Massachusetts. Introducing Millennial Money, our new interview series profiling millennials in different cities and at different income levels on how they make, spend and save their money. Read more about Trevor's budget breakdown here: https://cnb.cx/2R6aPnD » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #MillennialMoney Millennial Money: Living On $100K A Year In Boston | CNBC Make It.
Views: 298609 CNBC Make It.
Kevin O'Leary: The Age You Should Have Your Debt Paid Off By
 
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Kevin O'Leary explains why debt is evil and it's crucial to be debt-free by the time you hit this milestone. For many people just beginning their careers, retirement seems too far away to start planning. But in order to retire in your 60s, you need to get started down the right financial path early by saving and minimizing unnecessary debt, according to Kevin O'Leary, an investor on ABC's "Shark Tank" and personal finance author. "People today don't spend enough time thinking about the future and what they've got to save for when they get old," O'Leary tells CNBC Make It. "It's not easier when you're older to make money — it's easy to make money when you're younger. "You've got to save it while you're making it — that's the whole idea of financial freedom," says O'Leary. That's because your spending, responsibilities and likelihood to take on debt only increase as you get older. So start planning as early as possible for how to pay off that debt throughout your life, O'Leary suggests. That way, you can be financially secure by the time you retire. When should you aim to have it all paid off? Age 45, O'Leary says. "The reason I say 45 is the turning point, or in your 40s, is because think about a career: Most careers start in early 20s and end in the mid-60s," O'Leary says. "So, when you're 45 years old, the game is more than half over, and you better be out of debt, because you're going to use the rest of the innings in that game to accrue capital." » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt Kevin O'Leary: The Age You Should Have Your Debt Paid Off By | CNBC Make It.
Views: 33426 CNBC Make It.
Kevin O'Leary Explains Compound Interest With A Piggy Bank
 
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Kevin O'Leary answers the question, "How should I teach my children about money?" with this tip on explaining compound interest. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt Kevin O'Leary Explains Compound Interest With A Piggy Bank | CNBC Make It.
Views: 15643 CNBC Make It.
Millennial Millionaire: Don't Make These Side Hustle Mistakes
 
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Grant Sabatier earned over $1 million by age 30, in part by working up to 13 side gigs at a time. He shares his best advice for building a successful side hustle to earn extra cash in your spare time. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf The Millennial Money founder and author of "Financial Freedom: A Proven Path to All the Money You Will Ever Need" did a wide range of things to earn extra cash: He flipped domain names, bought and sold Volkswagen campers, invested in a moving company, and more. If you want to start a successful side hustle, or several, Sabatier says, there are four mistakes you should avoid. Don't invest too much money upfront A successful side hustle can bring in a substantial amount of money. But it's important to prove that your idea is profitable first, Sabatier tells CNBC Make It. That means starting small, whether it's building up a client list before starting a dog walking network, or selling an online course before expanding your web business. "Always do that before you invest a lot of money in launching your side hustle," he says. That way, "you know because you've sold a few that there are people out there that are willing to buy from you." Sabatier warns against sinking too much money in right away. If you decide to take on a side hustle without prior experience, dropping $10,000 on equipment or spending thousands on a custom-built website could put you into debt. Don't get in over your head It's crucial to start with a project that suits your current skill set, especially if you're new to the side hustle world, Sabatier says. "While everyone means well, a lot of people have really ambitious side hustles," he explains. "They're like, 'I have this incredible app idea and I'm going to launch it and it's going to be incredible. But I don't know how to code, and I've never built an app, and I don't know how to do it.'" Jumping straight into a complicated idea can leave you feeling overwhelmed and unmotivated. When people start with a difficult project, they often end up wasting months building something they aren't able to complete, Sabatier says. "They should have picked something a little bit simpler that they could have gotten started doing," he says. Don't underestimate the timeline In most cases, you're not going to build a successful company overnight. It's important to understand the reality of how long it will take to begin generating profits, Sabatier says. "People want to make money quickly. That's why they start side hustling," he says. "But in reality, any type of side hustle that you do is going to take some time to build. Maybe, depending upon how fast you work, three to four weeks or a couple months. You're probably not going to make money right away." And while it might be easy to envision yourself spending every spare moment working on your side hustle, how much time are you actually able to commit? Before you say yes to a side gig, it's also vital that you're realistic about how many hours a week you're able to invest, Sabatier says. Don't copy other people If you want to earn extra cash, choose something you'll enjoy spending your free time doing. "You should always start by trying to make some money doing something you love first," Sabatier says. He explains: "A lot of people look online and they see a side hustle that someone's doing, and they're really successful and they're like, 'I want to do that. I can make money doing that.' But in reality, if you don't enjoy what you're doing, you're not going to stick with it, and you're not going to have much fun." Basically, Sabatier argues, if you just copy someone else's idea, it's not necessarily going to be successful for you, no matter how well it works for them. You have to do what's going to engage, and work for, you. About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/2OIdwqJ #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt Millennial who banked $1 million in 5 years: Don't make these 4 mistakes when trying to earn extra cash | CNBC Make It.
Views: 17262 CNBC Make It.
Kevin O'Leary: Why I Make My Kids Fly Coach
 
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Kevin O'Leary says he teaches his kids a valuable lesson by having them fly coach when he flies first class. Kevin O'Leary runs several companies that bear his name: wine business O'Leary Fine Wines, private equity firm O'Leary Ventures and financial company O'Shares Investments. He's also famous as a judge on ABC's "Shark Tank," through which he's invested in businesses like Plated — a meal delivery company that sold to Albertson's for $300 million. But it took years for O'Leary to succeed in business. And that struggle taught him something important. "Entrepreneurship is not about the pursuit of wealth or money, nothing to do with it," he tells CNBC Make It. "It's the pursuit of personal freedom." It's a lesson he hopes to pass on to his children Trevor and Savannah, both now in their 20s. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt Kevin O'Leary: Why I Make My Kids Fly Coach | CNBC Make It.
Views: 19119 CNBC Make It.
Living On $150K A Year In NYC – Millennial Money
 
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Dijana Ilieva lives alone in New York City on $150K a year. She runs her own brand consulting agency and plans to retire by 40. Read more about Dijana's budget breakdown here: https://cnb.cx/2zRyaxU Introducing Millennial Money, our new interview series profiling millennials in different cities and at different income levels on how they make, spend and save their money. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #MillennialMoney Millennial Money: Living On $150K A Year In NYC | CNBC Make It.
Views: 993577 CNBC Make It.
Self-Made Millionaire Marcus Lemonis – Money Confessions
 
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Self-made millionaire Marcus Lemonis talks about some of his embarrassing purchases and bad investments. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #MoneyConfessions Marcus Lemonis Shares His Biggest Splurges And Money Secrets | CNBC Make It.
Views: 13551 CNBC Make It.
Lab-Grown Diamonds At A 30% Discount
 
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We took a lab-grown diamond ring to New York's diamond district and even jewelers couldn't tell the difference. But is lab-grown the way to go? » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt Lab-Grown Diamonds At A 30% Discount | CNBC Make It.
Views: 126163 CNBC Make It.
Ramit Sethi: Don't Buy A House Before You Ask This Question
 
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Real estate might not be the smartest investment for you. Use this test from self-made millionaire and personal finance guru Ramit Sethi to decide. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf "What if you discovered that real estate isn't as good of an investment as everybody says?" Sethi asks in an interview with CNBC Make It. Sethi is the author of "I Will Teach You to be Rich" and the founder of GrowthLab.com, an advice site for entrepreneurs. While many first-time home buyers go into the process assuming that they can turn a tidy profit on any real estate purchase, Sethi says it's not always so simple. In fact, there are a lot of obstacles and costs that can prevent your real estate purchase from being lucrative if you're not careful. "Most people never factor in all the phantom costs, including taxes [and] maintenance," Sethi says. "They don't factor in inflation and how that erodes the value of money over time." Another important possibility some home-buyers overlook is whether they'd be better off investing in stocks instead of real estate. "In fact, data shows that the stock market typically trounces the performance of real estate as an investment," Sethi says. The most important thing you can do before buying a house, Sethi says, is to "run the numbers." What you need to do, he says, is take into account your own finances and the average cost of buying versus renting a home in your area. You want to answer this important question: does buying a house make sense for you, where you live, as opposed to renting and putting the money you'd save into the stock market? You need to ask yourself: what's the best investment for you? Obviously, stock market performance versus real estate appreciation can depend on a wide range of factors, from buying a home in an up-and-coming neighborhood to investing right before an economic downturn or a boom market. Over time, though, stocks do generally perform better than real estate. "If you run the numbers, like me, you might discover that for where you live it actually makes no financial sense to buy," Sethi tells CNBC Make It. "Are there other reasons to buy? Of course. Maybe you want to buy because you want to knock that wall down. Maybe you want to buy because you want your kids to go to a certain school. Fine, but run the numbers." Sethi suggests going online to find one of the many "Buy vs. Rent" calculators offered by real estate and personal finance websites. Those sites take into account factors such as where you want to live and how much you can afford to pay (both for a down payment and monthly expenses) to give you an idea of whether it makes more sense for you to buy real estate or rent property. "Then you want to go a little deeper," Sethi says. "You want to say, 'You know what, what can I get in the stock market now?' Generally we can assume that over the long term, if we invest in a low-cost diversified index fund, we get about 7 percent [annualized returns]. Can you beat that in your area, over time, with real estate appreciation?" If you do your homework and it doesn't seem like the real estate you can afford in your area will generate better returns than the stock market over several years — and you don't mind renting long-term — then you might be better off not being a home-owner, Sethi says. Most importantly, though, you must do the math before making such a big decision. "For the biggest purchase of your life, you should know all the math and how it plays out 20 years in the future." About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/2OIdwqJ #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt Self-made millionaire: Don't buy a house before you ask yourself this question | CNBC Make It.
Views: 18685 CNBC Make It.
Pitbull Reveals His Most Important Lesson About Money
 
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Growing up in a rough part of Miami, Pitbull credits this guiding money principle for helping him continually improve his life. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt Pitbull Reveals His Most Important Lesson About Money | CNBC Make It.
Views: 64210 CNBC Make It.
$42 Million London Mansion – Secret Lives Of The Super Rich
 
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Located in the ultra-luxurious and exclusive London neighborhood of Mayfair is "Culross House" — one of the most expensive homes currently on the market in the U.K., listed for £32.5 million ($41.8 million). » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/2OIdwqJ #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt Secret Lives Of The Super Rich – $42 Million London Mansion | CNBC Make It.
Views: 21844 CNBC Make It.
How Mentally Strong People Achieve Success
 
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Everyone experiences setbacks. Here's how to bounce back better than before. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf Amy Morin is a bestselling author, speaker and psychotherapist who gained popularity after her viral 2015 TED Talk, “The Secret of Becoming Mentally Strong. ” In her three books, including her most recent release, “13 Things Mentally Strong Women Don’t Do, ” Morin explores the practices and habits that make some people mentally tougher than others and better able to succeed personally and professionally. “I started my life as a psychotherapist thinking I was going to teach people about mental strength based off what I learned in college,” she tells CNBC Make It. But after experiencing a series of losses in her own life, Morin says that she started to study her patients to try to understand why some bounced back from pain faster than others. “My mother passed away suddenly. I was a widow at age 26, and then my father-in-law was diagnosed with terminal cancer,” she says. ”[Those events] led me on this personal journey to learn more about what it means to be mentally strong.” Below, Morin breaks down five things that mentally strong people do to achieve success after a setback: 1. Regulate their emotions Everyone experiences conflict and setbacks, personally and professionally. But, rather than letting their emotions fly off the handle, Morin says mentally strong people know how regulate their feelings so that they don’t do or say anything that will cost them in the long run. “They don’t let their anger cause them to do things that they later regret, or if they’re sad they don’t get stuck in a bad mood,” she says. ”[Mentally strong people] are able to control their feelings well enough that they can move forward.” 2. Take positive action Instead of letting a bad moment deter them from moving forward with a goal or project, Morin says mentally strong people know how to turn a negative into a positive in order to move ahead. “Even if they’re having a bad day or they’re feeling kind of stuck in a rut they know, ‘OK what can I do about this?’” she says. “They don’t sit around and feel sorry for themselves or convince themselves that they shouldn’t try. Instead, they identify concrete steps they can take to make their life better.” 3. Regulate their thoughts In addition to controlling their emotions, Morin says mentally strong people also know the importance of controlling their thoughts so that they don’t dwell on the negative for too long. She explains that rather than having an “overly negative or overly exaggerated” mindset, mentally strong people identify the untrue thoughts they’re having “and replace them and re-frame them with more realistic statements.” 4. Identify their worst habit “Too often,” Morin says, “we tend to engage in all these good habits that busy ourselves but don’t necessarily get us anywhere.” That’s driven by the bad habits that we continue to hold on to. She advises anyone who is looking to be mentally tougher to look at their mental strength in the same way they look at their physical strength. “Maybe you’d go to the gym to become physically stronger,” she says. “But, if you really want to see results you’d also want to give up junk food. Mental strength is the same. So, if you have good habits like practicing gratitude, or you spend time with your friends, or you have hobbies that you enjoy, then that’s great. But, if you also spend time feeling sorry for yourself or expecting yourself to be perfect, all those good habits won’t necessarily be effective.” Morin says, mentally strong people know that it’s important for them to identify their worst mental habit because once they “get rid of that, all of [their] other good habits become much more effective.” 5. Practice gratitude According to Morin, mentally strong people know the value of practicing gratitude. In fact, research shows that people who practice gratitude tend to live happier and healthier lives. “You could start a gratitude journal,” she suggests. “Studies show if you just write down three things that you’re grateful for before you go to bed you’ll sleep better.” Or, instead of starting a journal, Morin says you can also “start a gratitude habit with your family over dinner,” identifying the little things you’re grateful for. About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/2OIdwqJ #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt 5 things mentally strong people do to achieve success | CNBC Make It.
Views: 15053 CNBC Make It.
Suzy Welch: How To Answer The Question 'Why Should We Hire You?'
 
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When you're prepping for a job interview, it's important to consider not just the potential curveballs you might be pitched, but also the seemingly straightforward questions like interviewer favorite, "Why should we hire you?" Bestselling management author and CNBC contributor Suzy Welch tells CNBC Make It that while this question may seem like an easy one, you better be prepared to answer it. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf “Your opening salvo should sound like this: ‘You should hire me because I have the skills, values and desire to deliver results from day one.’” Then she says, you want to “amplify that statement” by taking each of the three steps below in your answer: 1. Highlight your skills First, Welch says, you need to explain the skills that you bring to the table and how they make you, specifically, a “perfect fit” for the job. She gives examples like, “You need quantitative analysis. That was my college major,” and “You’re looking for innovation. That’s exactly what I did at my last job.” “The key here is to be as specific as possible,” Welch emphasizes. “With your particular capabilities and experiences, you are the puzzle piece the hiring company is looking for.” 2. Demonstrate your values It’s time to highlight how your values and the organization’s values align. “Here are your company’s values,” Welch recommends you say, “which I happen to know so well. And great news — I not only share those values, I embrace them.” Welch adds that you’ll receive bonus points if you have an actual story “that shows you demonstrating that statement in action, with an example of your tenacity, say, or bent for collaboration, or authenticity.” 3. Tell them how much you want the job Being transparent about how bad you want a job, Welch admits, can feel awkward. But, she says, “job hunting is an awkward and vulnerable experience, and having the poise and self-confidence to reveal your beating heart of desire to a prospective employer is amazingly powerful.” She encourages job-seekers to frankly state how much they want a position, because employers read it as “appealing and authentic.” You’re probably going to get this interview question. The key, Welch says, is to “not let it faze you.” Suzy Welch is the co-founder of the Jack Welch Management Institute and a noted business journalist, TV commentator and public speaker. Think you need Suzy to fix your career? Email her at [email protected] About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/2OIdwqJ #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #SuzyWelch Suzy Welch: Here’s how to answer the interview question, ‘Why should we hire you?’ | CNBC Make It.
Views: 7492 CNBC Make It.
Here's How To Ace The Interview Question, "Why Do You Want This Job?" | CNBC Make It.
 
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CNBC contributor Suzy Welch shares strategies for answering the interview question, "Why do you want this job?". » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt Here's How To Ace The Interview Question, "Why Do You Want This Job?" | CNBC Make It.
Views: 5515 CNBC Make It.
Berkshire Hathaway's Charlie Munger: Amazon Is 'Utter Phenomenon'
 
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Jeff Bezos is "ferociously smart," says Berkshire Hathaway vice chairman Charlie Munger. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf On the heels of Amazon canceling plans to build a New York City headquarters, Warren Buffett's right-hand man Charlie Munger shared his view of Amazon with CNBC. "My attitude toward Amazon is it is an utter phenomenon of nature," Munger told CNBC's Becky Quick Thursday. "There has hardly ever been anything like it in the history of our country ... very talented driven people." The vice chairman of Berkshire Hathaway, who is worth $1.7 billion, according to Forbes, says he has been surprised at Amazon's growth. "I would not have predicted the success that happened and now that it has happened, I wouldn't want to predict that it was going to stop either. I think it may run a long way." Munger has also called founder and CEO Jeff Bezos "ferociously smart." Bezos quit a steady job in 1994 when the internet was new to found Amazon, which now has a market cap of more than $790 billion. "I founded Amazon in my garage 24 years ago, and drove all the packages to the post office myself. Today, Amazon employs more than 600,000 people, just finished its most profitable year ever, even while investing heavily in new initiatives, and it's usually somewhere between the #1 and #5 most valuable company in the world," Bezos said in a recent Medium post. "I will let those results speak for themselves." As for Amazon's long-term prospects, "My guess is he still has a long ways to go ... up," says Munger. And Munger is not only a fan of Amazon, he also supports Bezos exposing The National Enquirer's for allegedly blackmailing the CEO with intimate pictures. "I admire people who simply confront problems head on," Munger says of Bezos' public letter to Enquirer boss David Becker. "I have no quarrel with his confronting The National Enquirer, but I regard it as a little nothing place that the world would be, could well do without and so ... to the extent that they behave badly and he is objecting vigorously, I am all for it." American Media Inc., which publishes the National Enquirer tabloid, told CNBC in a previous statement that what Bezos called blackmail was "in good faith negotiations to resolve all matters with him," but "in light of the nature of the allegations published by Mr. Bezos, the Board has convened and determined that it should promptly and thoroughly investigate the claims." About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/2OIdwqJ #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #Amazon Warren Buffett's right-hand man Charlie Munger: Amazon is 'an utter phenomenon of nature' | CNBC Make It.
Views: 22791 CNBC Make It.
How This 33-Year-Old CEO Launched A $10 Million Business
 
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Jaclyn Johnson, founder of Create & Cultivate, had a reported income of $700,000 in 2017. Here's how she got started. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/2OIdwqJ #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt How This 33-Year-Old CEO Launched A $10 Million Business | CNBC Make It.
Views: 44330 CNBC Make It.
Tony Robbins: Money Doesn’t Equal Happiness. Here’s What Does
 
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Life coach and self-made millionaire Tony Robbins says that obsessing over money is not the path to happiness — instead, this is his advice. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf Helping other people can give you long-lasting joy and the feeling of true wealth, according to life coach and self-made millionaire Tony Robbins. "Lots of people get a billion dollars and they're not wealthy, because wealth is emotion, it's psychology, it's spirit, it's soul," Robbins tells CNBC Make It. One of the "biggest mistakes" that people make, Robbins adds, is to obsess only over making money instead of on improving quality of life for themselves and the people they care about. "You think, 'I've got to make this money so my family will stay together or I've got to make this money so there's enough food…" Robbins says. He adds that this way of thinking is often described as a "scarcity mentality," where people believe that there isn't enough money to go around, so they obsess over the goal of clinging to money and objects while ignoring other sources of happiness like personal growth and relationships. "Really, quality of life comes by finding a way to add more value to other people's lives," Robbins tells CNBC Make It. Robbins notes that there is research that explores "what stimulates and sustains wellbeing and happiness, and the thing that does the least is buying things." In other words, obsessing over money and buying material objects might give you momentary pleasure, Robbins says, but that good feeling typically does not stick around for long after you've made a purchase. "The [material things you buy] don't last, you get used to them," Robbins says. "What's more valuable, if you want happiness, is clearly being able to have experiences. When you buy experiences, they linger. A trip, the experiences, the emotions, all that." An experience like a vacation might produce lasting memories that provide longer-lasting happiness, but that feeling still doesn't compare to making other people happy, according to Robbins. "When you buy something for yourself, the pleasure almost never lasts that long. If it's something huge, it doesn't even last that long..." he says. "Giving money away actually gives more joy than almost anything else on the planet." If you want to be happy, Robbins' advice is to do something for another person today — you don't even have to know the person. Just test it out, see if it's true or if I'm full of it. Do something really unique, and don't do it to get [something], do it because you just want to give." "There have been times when I've had nothing and I gave that money away, and the level of freedom it created in me ... I can't even describe to you verbally." The pleasure that you derive from helping others can be life-changing, Robbins says. "You're going to find a giant shift, and that shift will change the way you do business, it will change the way you approach your family, it will change the way you feel about yourself and it'll give you the experience of wealth," he says. About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/2OIdwqJ #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #TonyRobbins Tony Robbins: Money doesn’t equal happiness — here’s what does | CNBC Make It.
Views: 14054 CNBC Make It.
Tony Robbins: How Millennials Can Retire Rich
 
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When you're young, "you have the greatest gift on earth," says self-made millionaire and bestselling author Tony Robbins. Use your advantages, and you can end up wealthy. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf Retiring rich may be more possible than you think. Especially if you're young, you don't even need to make a lot of money to end up wealthy, says Tony Robbins, a self-made millionaire and the best-selling author of "Money: Master the Game." If you consistently set aside a portion of your earnings, whether you make $40,000 or $100,000, and let it grow over time, you could end up with a seven-figure portfolio. If you're just starting out in the workforce, "you have the greatest gift on earth: time and compounding," he says. All millennials need to do is to use those advantages, he says, adding: "When they asked Warren Buffett, 'What made you a wealthy man? He said, 'Good genetics, time and compounding.'" How exactly can these ingredients — time and compounding — help you build your net worth? For starters, it's important to understand how compounding works. What is compound interest? Compound interest makes a sum of money grow at a faster rate than simple interest, because in addition to earning returns on the money you invest, you also earn returns on those returns at the end of every compounding period, which could be daily, monthly, quarterly or annually. That's why compound interest causes your wealth grow faster. It's also why you don't have to put away as much money to reach your goals. Compound interest can also work against you when it comes to loans: It means that every year or month, whatever the frequency specific to your loan, the amount you have to repay gets bigger. So the longer it takes to pay off your loan, the more you'll owe in interest. Why does time matter? The sooner you start to invest your money, the more you'll benefit from compound interest. Starting to save early means you don't have to put away as much over time — and even a few years can make a big difference. To show just how advantageous it is to start saving and investing early on, personal finance site NerdWallet created a chart showing the percentage of each twice-a-month paycheck you'd need to set aside to have $2 million saved by the time you're 67. It assumes two different starting points, age 22 and age 30, and that you're start with zero dollars invested. It also assumes a 6% average annual investment return and various annual salaries. The 22-year-old has just an eight-year head start on the 30-year-old, but that makes a significant difference in how much is needed to save per paycheck. How to use compound interest to your advantage Almost anyone save and invest of portion of their paycheck, says Robbins, no matter the size of their salary: "Oftentimes people tell me, 'I don't have any money. ... I don't know where to start. I've got to wait until I have money before I begin [investing].' That is the biggest mistake you can make." Even if you can only save 1% to 5% of your income in a retirement account, start there. "What you want is consistency," Robbins says. Then, work towards setting aside 10% to 20%. That may sound daunting, but it'll be easier to do if you make it automatic, meaning that you have your contributions automatically taken out of your paycheck and sent straight to your retirement account. As for where you should invest, the simplest starting point is to contribute to your employer's 401(k) plan, a tax-advantaged retirement savings account that many companies offer, or other retirement savings accounts, such as a Roth IRA or traditional IRA. Many experts, including Warren Buffett, recommend investing in low-cost index funds, like ones that track the S&P 500, which holds stocks for 500 of the largest companies in the U.S., including Apple, Exxon and Johnson & Johnson. You can also look into robo-advisors, such as Betterment, Wealthsimple and Wealthfront. These are automated investing services that use an algorithm to determine the kind of portfolio that's right for your age, risk tolerance and time horizon. No matter how you choose to invest, the most important step is to open at least one account and start contributing to it consistently to take full advantage of compound interest. The earlier you start, the better off you'll be. About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/2OIdwqJ #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #RetireRich Tony Robbins: Millennials, you have the 2 things you need to retire rich | CNBC Make It.
Views: 12364 CNBC Make It.
Jocko Willink: How To Wake Up Early
 
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“You’ve got 24 hours in a day,” says Jocko Willink, a former Navy SEAL and the founder of leadership consultancy Echelon Front. “The earlier you get up, the more you can take advantage of those hours.” » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf Willink, who wakes at 4:30 a.m., says that getting up early can help you stay productive and competitive. He taught himself to be an early riser as a young SEAL after noticing that some of the best people in the field got to work before he did. “I started waking up earlier so I could maybe get a little edge,” he says. CNBC Make It caught up with Willink for his tips for those training themselves to be early risers. Listen to your body Pick a time to wake each morning and make sure that you commit to that time. If you do, you’ll find yourself getting tired earlier and earlier in the evening. Give yourself that rest, he says. Go to bed earlier and earlier until you have developed a new night-time routine and a new fixed bedtime. “It takes discipline,” says Willink. “When you make that discipline decision early in the morning, the rest of your day is going to have more discipline in it.” Don’t sleep in on Saturday By the weekend, you might be tempted to sleep in. Don’t, says Willink. If you do, “by the time Monday morning rolls around you won’t feel like waking up early.” Keep your bedtime and your wake time consistent to ensure you can keep to your early rising schedule. “Get up early and get up early every day,” he says. Give yourself time to adjust Willink says people are surprised that just going to bed as early as 9:30 p.m. isn’t enough to become an early riser. He says people find they can’t force themselves to sleep and will often lie in bed awake until their usual bedtime, making early rising impossible. Remember that creating new habits won’t happen overnight, he says. Change will take time. About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/2OIdwqJ #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt Former Navy SEAL commander Jocko Willink explains how to train yourself to be an early riser | CNBC Make It.
Views: 10649 CNBC Make It.
Suzy Welch: Here’s The Secret To Answering “Do You Have Any Questions?” | CNBC Make It.
 
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Use that common interview question to demonstrate your ability to think strategically, says management author and CNBC contributor Suzy Welch. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt Suzy Welch: Here’s The Secret To Answering “Do You Have Any Questions?” | CNBC Make It.
Views: 6483 CNBC Make It.
How Successful People Deal With Setbacks – Scott Galloway
 
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Life is sometimes unfair, unreasonable or unjust. But how you handle these situations is one of the things that separates successful people from the unsuccessful, says self-made multimillionaire and serial entrepreneur Scott Galloway. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf “You will know failure.... You will be treat treated unfairly at work. You will get fired. Your businesses will fail,” Galloway tells CNBC Make It. “Before the age of 40, I had businesses go bankrupt, I had a marriage fail and I lost the only person that to that moment I knew loved me — my mother. “But for me, these were setbacks not barriers,” says Galloway, who sold his company L2, Inc., reportedly for over $130 million. “It’s easy to hold a grudge, it’s easy to have a difficult time not getting over an injustice,” says Galloway. But “your ability to move on and not hold grudges and not hold anger inside such that it starts to almost burn your veins like acid is a key” to being successful in life, Galloway says. “Success is a function of your resilience over your failure.” Be upset — that’s natural, says Galloway, “but then get up, dust your pants off and move on, recognizing that failure is part of the arc of success.” Things like exercise, spirituality or something as simple as talking about what made you angry can help you move on, says Galloway. Indeed, despite his own setbacks, Galloway has gone on to massive success. Among other things, Galloway has founded multiple companies: L2, a subscription business intelligence firm that he sold in 2017; Red Envelope, an e-commerce firm which he took public and sold in March 2008; and Prophet, a global brand strategy consultancy with more than 250 professionals. So instead of putting your energy into holding a grudge, focus on achieving what you want in life. “Some of the best advice I’ve ever received was from an exceptionally successful individual who was the chairman of a large Fortune 500 company,” Galloway says. That person said, ‘Scott, the best revenge is to live an amazing life.’ “So don’t focus on what’s wrong with your life, focus on what you need to get to that point where you have a great life. That is the best revenge against the universe and anyone or any organization that has done you wrong.” About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/2OIdwqJ #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt Self-made millionaire: Getting angry is easy — this is what successful people do instead | CNBC Make It.
Views: 7223 CNBC Make It.
'Shark Tank' Kevin O’Leary Was Fired From His First Job. Here’s How It Motivated Him | CNBC Make It.
 
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Mr. Wonderful only lasted one day as an ice cream scooper. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: http://cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: http://www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: http://bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt 'Shark Tank' Kevin O’Leary Was Fired From His First Job. Here’s How It Motivated Him | CNBC Make It.
Views: 9630 CNBC Make It.

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